Cullen Skink 🤢

Fish header comic

I struggled when asked to describe my cooking style, as it is a mixture of passion and seasonality. I grew up on a diet, and although it is interesting that I call the dish decadent, variations on potatoes, dairy products and smoked fish have been the backbone of my diet for many years. But I prefer to cook from scratch and keep my mashed potato fish version of Cullen Skink as close as possible to my original recipe. It does the work of thickening, but I miss the potato pieces in other soups, so I keep it pureed. Sources: 0, 5, 7, 9

Gary then added pieces of potato to the liquid soup along with the haddock, which allowed me to make the rest of Cullen Skink’s ingredients. Mark Hix used a mixture of onions, celery, carrots and garlic, which I find unfortunate, as the sweetness of the onions makes a nice contrast to the savoury fish flavour. I add the boiled potatoes and mix with milk and cream before serving. Remove the smoked haddock from the milk and puree in a food processor until it thickens and the potatoes are chunky. Sources: 0, 3

In a large soup pan, heat or melt the butter or oil, add the onions and leeks and cook over medium heat for about 5 minutes until soft. While the soup is being cooked, remove the skin and bones from the smoked haddock and break it into relatively large, flaky pieces. Heat the soups in the microwave for a few minutes, taking care not to crush the fish or potatoes too much. Sources: 4, 5, 7

And there it is, the rich and creamy Cullen Skink, served with a garnish of parsley and ideally crispy bread. This is a hearty, creamy, smoked leg of fish stuffed with potatoes and onions and warmed on a cool Scottish-American day. Filled with wintry ingredients to warm up and enriched, comforting with milk and cream, it always makes me laugh, even on the darkest days of January. Sources: 0, 8, 10

Cullen is a skink who has a more mysterious history than you might have imagined, and comes from the north-east of Scotland. The Cullen is one of those skinks that have more than a few interesting and puzzling stories. Sources: 0, 4

This dish usually uses smoked haddock, called finan haddie, but you will find that the base is always smoked haddock with potatoes and onions. The Scottish soup was prepared in this way, and the most famous ingredient of the dish, smoked fish soup, is usually made with a simple smoked fish soup. When villages became specialists in the production of smoked haddock, they had a much greater supply than beef, so they were used in the past for the production of simple smoked fish soups. They became a basic part of traditional soup recipes, which resulted in a distinctive and savory soup. Sources: 2, 8

This is a wonderful winter comfort food, but most smoked haddock you will find cold smoked and so fine. I know you may not be able to find Finnan Haddad as such, and in warmer weather he would simply be made less thick, so I am sure most of you will not. Sources: 3, 4

This is one of the hardest posts for me to write, although I know what Cullen Skink is, but I have a recipe for a clunky style of it and I will share this with you in due course. Sources: 5, 6

The first time I heard of Cullen Skink, I was in Aberdeen, Scotland, filming my aunt Virginia doing it when we were in Scotland. The next batch of them will be made with a recipe from a Scottish cookbook, heeding Melanie’s advice. Sources: 3, 10

One of the best fish soups in the world is the classic French pastry, and I didn’t act like a great example. This version of Cullen Skink is a creamy, light soup with a smoked flavour, but it is also very rich and rich in fishy flavours. Sources: 0, 6

When I first saw Cullen Skink on the menu, I had no idea what this hearty Scottish haddock soup was, but it is now one of my favourites. This hearty soup is made from milk, smoked fish, potatoes and onions from a small village in the Scottish Highlands, just outside Glasgow. Sources: 7, 8

Haggis is found all over Scotland and is usually made in sheep’s poultry, but you can also get it in a variety of other forms, such as in pubs and restaurants. Served with mashed potatoes, mashed beets or mashed potatoes, it is hugely popular, and some restaurants add their own twist. Sources: 1

Indeed, several areas of Britain claim the best fish and chips, and in Edinburgh they are certainly doing well. British thing they really are, but in reality they are less a “British” thing than a “British” thing. Sources: 1

You may have extra vegetables in your fish cube, but it depends on how fishy the soup should taste and how much flavor it has absorbed during cooking. Other dishes worth trying are fish and chips with sausage and cheese or fish, chips and sauce. Scottish food may not be all that well known, but there are some great dishes worth getting to know. Sources: 1, 4, 8

Food: Cullen Skink

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2012/jan/05/how-to-cook-perfect-cullen-skink 0

https://edinburgh247.com/traditional-scottish-food-worth-eating-in-edinburgh/ 1

https://blog.youk.co/british-classics-cullen-skink/ 2

https://www.christinascucina.com/cullen-skink-just-a-strange-scottish-name-for-smoked-haddock-chowder/ 3

https://www.carolinescooking.com/cullen-skink/ 4

https://wearenotfoodies.com/cullen-skink-a-fishy-tale-of-smoked-haddock-chowder/ 5

https://angiemilne.com/2020/03/04/cullen-skink-soup/ 6

https://www.foodiequine.co.uk/2017/07/cullen-skink-soup-traditional-scottish.html 7

https://www.scottishscran.com/simple-cullen-skink-recipe/ 8

https://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/2019/04/30/cullen-skink/15556824008006 9

https://healthychristianhome.com/american-style-cullen-skink/ 10


Published by Something Complicated

I’m the correct Something!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: